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lionfish invasive species

Posted by Slickrock Adventures on August 16, 2016

Lionfish hunting in Belize

I have posted often about hunting lionfish and the Belize lionfish invasion. Lionfish were first spotted at Glover’s Reef in the winter of 2009. We heard about them in an article online, and notified our island staff. Within days, they spotted the first lionfish; it was uncanny. Since that time, we have actively pursued them with spearguns while snorkeling to keep their numbers down as much

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Posted by Slickrock Adventures on February 28, 2013

The Caymans take the lionfish fight to a whole new level

The fight to combat the invasive lionfish (which is decimating coral reef fish domains in the Caribbean) took another step in the right direction when the Cayman Islands Tourism Association announced a new lionfish-spearing contest that doubles as a publicity push to increase demand for the fish from local restaurants – Restaurants And Watersports Operators To Partner For Major Lionfish Cul

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Posted by Slickrock Adventures on October 4, 2012

A new theory on how the lionfish invasion began

We have blogged about the invasive lionfish a number of times, but this New York Times article by Carl Safina sheds an entirely unique perspective on the crisis. Carl Safina is founder of Blue Ocean Institute at Stony Brook University and a MacArthur Fellow. His books include “A Sea in Flames: The Deepwater Horizon Oil Blowout,” and “The View From Lazy Point; A Natural Year in an Unnatural

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Posted by Slickrock Adventures on August 2, 2012

Catch, kill, eat, repeat!

Over the past couple of years, out at Slickrock’s Adventure Island on Glover’s Reef, we’ve seen a dramatic increase in the lionfish population. And we’ve blogged about the problem at least five times over the past couple of years. That’s because the lionfish, an invasive species, is decimating coral reef fish populations all across the Caribbean. Leading the charge in

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Posted by Slickrock Adventures on March 30, 2012

Enjoy an invasive species on your Belize vacation

Last week we served lionfish on our Belize island. Our island is in a Marine Reserve, and fishing is prohibited by guests except for catch-and-release sportfishing. But lionfish are the exception. Lionfish are a Pacific fish and only recently got introduced to the Caribbean. They have no predators are are voracious eaters. They are a problem. We have blogged about this before: http://belizeadventu

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Posted by Slickrock Adventures on March 2, 2012

Belize kayak snorkeling at Horseshoe Reef

On Glover’s Reef at Long Caye, we go kayak snorkeling every day. Guides are skilled at teaching guests to safely exit and re-enter their sea kayak without overturning. This allows everyone maximum access to snorkeling the 900 patch reefs on Glover’s Reef. Here we are snorkeling at Horseshoe Reef, about 3/4 of a mile from our island. You can see that one of the guides has a spear gun. H

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Posted by Slickrock Adventures on July 11, 2011

Lionfish – an invasive species in Belize

Last March I wrote about fishing for lionfish on our island, Long Caye at Glover’s Reef. Glover’s Reef is a protected Marine Reserve, and therefore fishing is prohibited (except catch-and-release for sport fishermen). The only fish you can catch and keep is lionfish. This is because these fish are non-native and a very recent arrival in the Caribbean, as this is a Pacific fish. Lionfish are a

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Posted by Slickrock Adventures on March 18, 2011

Fishing for lionfish

A few weeks ago we wrote about spearfishing for lionfish, our newest sport on our island in Belize. Lionfish were introduced to the Atlantic basin recently, and arrived at Glover’s Reef just 2 years ago. Now there is a Caribbean-wide mission to keep their numbers down, as they have no natural predators since they are a Pacific fish. They will eventually eat all of the coral fishes in the sma

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Posted by Slickrock Adventures on February 28, 2011

Lionfish at Glover’s Reef

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