Frequently Asked Questions

What About Emergencies in Belize?

What to do in an emergency in Belize? How can my family contact me if they need to? These questions are important, and we have the answers!

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Can my family contact me if there is an emergency?

Our Belize family resort is the ultimate destination for your whole family. However, if some members of your family could not join you, leave our office number in the United States with your relatives for emergency contact, but inform them that it could take over a day to get through. We do not pass on messages of a non-emergency nature. You should not promise to call home when you arrive in Belize; it can be difficult and very expensive. Your cell phone may not work in Belize, although some do. Your cell phone will definitely not work on the island.

David Platner

What happens if I get hurt?

Staff members are trained in First Aid and phone contact is maintained at all times (as long as the phones are working in Belize!) Evacuations by boat can be arranged, but you will have to pay all expenses. There is a rental helicopter in Belize, but no medical helicopter at this time. If inland, transportation to Belize City is easily arranged, but also at your expense. Be sure you have funds on hand to pay for any emergency! Hospitals in Belize DO accept credit cards. Be sure to purchase a travel insurance policy, they should reimburse you for evacuation expenses in the event that you were injured and needed to leave the trip. See Our Hints for a Better Vacation for our recommendations for travel insurance.

I’ve heard bad things about Belize City, are they true?

Belize City has an unsavory reputation, which is somewhat deserved. You should not walk alone at night, but it is safe to walk around during the day provided you adopt a confident attitude. If you’re worried, stay at one of the better hotels and take cabs within the city. If approached by street people ignore them or say, “Thanks, I’m all set.” They are rarely dangerous, but once you acknowledge them, they’re hard to get rid of. Act like you know where you are going, and watch out for scams like “fund-raisers.” When taking a cab in Belize, always settle the price before getting in (make clear it is per cab, not per person.) Surprises are common in this region and one should be prepared to accept canceled reservations, closed businesses, or broken commitments. Our staff makes every effort to insulate you from these problems, but we too must live with their system.

 

[photo credit at top of page: Barry Tessman]